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One may turn to various sources from which to base a philosophy of leadership. A source that has stood the test of time is the New Testament. Therein, one finds two prominent metaphors for leadership: The shepherd and the servant. For example, Jesus is pictured as a shepherd. The figure of a shepherd also is used to describe the leader of an assembly. Moreover, this picture is filled out through leadership qualifications, which, in turn, imply the leader’s role: An effective leader must be a person of exemplary character, because he or she serves as a model or pattern for others to follow. In addition to a shepherd, Jesus is depicted as a servant. From his teaching and example, we learn that one leads best by serving, not by domineering those one is entrusted with leading.*

Before developing the relationship of the metaphors shepherd and servant to the deanship, one must first summarize the nature of that role. The dean is the manager of the academic affairs of the College in behalf of the President. In other words, the dean supervises the fulfillment of the College’s mission and carries out the President’s directions. The dean’s primary concern, then, is teaching and learning. To this end, through faculty, and academic staff, and in consultation with the President, the dean directs the accomplishment and assessment of this mission. This direction includes the development of a consensus with respect to the College’s mission, goals, and objectives. The dean’s role, then, also involves overseeing the implementation, staffing, maintenance, and regular assessment of academic programs, curricula, student outcomes, and policies and procedures. All of these activities need to be performed in a way consistent with the highest standards of educational practice and excellence.

With this brief synopsis of the function of the dean in hand, one may now apply to the deanship the leadership roles of shepherd and servant. As a shepherd, the dean continually needs to articulate the rationale and implications of the College’s mission, with the goal that it becomes for all a matter of internal conviction. In addition, like a shepherd, the dean must be forward looking, a visionary. Accordingly, the dean must engage in continuous personal education and research, so that he can initiate ideas that will help with the ongoing process of assessing and revising all facets of the academic affairs of the College. These ideas must be considered within a collaborative relationship with the faculty. The dean’s goal, much like that of a coach with a team is to draw out the best results from the faculty for the sake of the College and thus its students. The dean must work closely with the faculty in considering academic matters, particularly through committee work and work with division chairs, providing a model of collaborative deliberation. The dean must also work closely with each individual division head in the management of division responsibilities of planning and assessment, helping the division chairs to utilize a collaborative relationship with those who make up the division. The dean’s aim is the ownership by all faculty members of the mission, goals, and objectives of the College and those of the division in which they serve. The dean’s desire is that everyone in the College identifies his or her success with student success. This identification will be possible largely to the extent that there is available to faculty a meaningful level of participation, a genuine opportunity to contribute.

The dean will not only shepherd, but also serve. The dean serves faculty members by facilitating their involvement in the continuing business of the College. The dean also serves faculty members by (more…)

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“My fear for you is not that you will fail, but that you will succeed at something that doesn’t matter.” Unknown

“Know your product. Believe in your product. Always tell the truth.” Warren Milliman, my father, on sales.

“Leadership, above all, consists of telling the truth, unpalatable though it may be. It is better to go down with the truth on one’s lips than to rise high by innuendo and doubletalk.” Alfred Robens, d. 1999, MP, 1945 – 1961; Privy Council appointment 1951

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