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Posts Tagged ‘education’

Education may be defined as an action or process of formal teaching by precept, example, or experience that results in the knowledge of information and skills, and mental, spiritual, and aesthetic development.

This definition includes five essential components of education that each may be identified with a word beginning with the letter “a”: (1) The actors of education are the teachers and students. (2) The aim of education is the outcome in the students desired by the teachers, i.e., that which must be learned and that into which one must develop. (3) The actions of education are teaching by the teachers and learning by the students. (4) The avenue of education is the curriculum or course of study taught by the teachers to achieve the desired outcome in the students. (5) The assessment of education is the evaluation of the desired outcome, curriculum, teaching, and learning in order to maximize each of these components

Effective education depends upon the extent to which each of the actors, teachers and students, understand and fulfill their roles with respect to the other essential components of education. Teachers have the primary responsibility for successful student outcomes. Furthermore, this responsibility of teachers is the one over which all educators, not only teachers, but also administrators, have the most control.

Teachers initiate education by establishing desired student outcomes: the desired knowledge of information and skills, and mental, spiritual, and aesthetic development. Next, they create the curriculum in the form of programs, and the courses of which these programs consist, to accomplish these objectives. They then teach the curriculum with methods designed to elicit learning. Finally, they assess the learner for the achievement of outcomes, and they also assess their teaching for its effectiveness in obtaining the outcomes

The curriculum utilized to accomplish student outcomes in a university education will center on the liberal arts. The liberal arts are comprised of those disciplines that seek to describe and interpret the cosmos and human existence. Therefore, they deal largely with metaphysical issues, matters that have the greatest significance for life. For example, the liberal arts equip one to make judgments about ideas and values, answering such questions as the following ones: What is the meaning of life? What is true? What is just? What is moral? What is beautiful? Consequently, they also concern themselves with relationships.

The disciplines that historically have comprised the liberal arts overlap. Therefore, the disciplines ideally should not be taught discretely, but holistically, with teachers working across disciplines in dialogue and collaboration with one another. These disciplines typically have included the humanities, which are more subjective in their orientation (e.g., theology, philosophy, literature, rhetoric, music, art, and history). They also include the more objective sciences, both the natural (including mathematics) sciences and social sciences.

The desired outcome of a liberal arts education is (more…)

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Institutions of higher learning identify themselves first and foremost as educational institutions. But, what does it mean to be an educational institution? What is education? In order better to understand the meaning of education, it is helpful to compare it to another valuable activity in which institutions of higher learning typically engage, training.

The noun “training” derives from the verb “train.” To train is to teach so as to make fit, qualified, or proficient (Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary). Training focuses on how to do a job. It is related more to practice, though it is based on theory. For example, training is prevalent in programs of nursing, teaching, counseling, accounting, athletic training, etc.

The noun “education” derives from the verb “educate.” To educate is to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically, especially by instruction (Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary). Education focuses on furnishing the mind. It is related more to theory, though it results in practice. It involves learning a discipline and setting it against the background of the knowledge of Western civilization. It is grounded in the humanities, mathematics, and the sciences.

All disciplines have an educational component. In addition, all disciplines either have a training component (e.g., nursing or business) or provide the foundation for training that occurs in a different or related discipline (e.g., English or history). Education, then, may include training, but training must include education. Both training and education are important, but while not all university students will receive training, all students must get an education. Education must have priority, for there cannot be excellent training without excellent education.

While there will always be a tension between the need to educate and the desire to train at a university, one should not accept the proposition that one must choose one pole or the other. Both education and training are important and both are fundamental to the modern university. Nevertheless, education must be primary. For example, a university’s general education component must take pride of place.

Education, in general, and the general education component, in particular, pursues a critical goal: the development of fully integrated individuals who are able to think critically and soundly. Put another way, education is the means by which students develop a view of the world from which they can interpret all of life, a lens through which they can clearly see and understand life. In other words, educators seek to cultivate people that are truly human.

To be sure, education is more that the courses that compose a university’s general education component. Rather, education forms the foundation a university. Through education, university faculty seek not only to teach students how to make a living, but more importantly, how to live. Education equips them to formulate judgments about and make positive contributions to the key forces of cultural influence in our time.

So, universities must pursue excellence in training. They must strive to have excellent professional programs. But, they especially must pursue excellence in education. This pursuit is dictated by a university’s mission. It is what draws teachers to a university, in order to fulfill their vocation. And, it is what gives teachers hope as they gladly continue the sacrificial service of investing their days in the lives of the students with which they have been entrusted.

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Tweets taken from my Twitter feed over the course of the last week:
  • Last week of classes every school year is bittersweet, more bitter than sweet.  #professionalstudent #rabbiforlife #livetoteach
  • After all of the years of finals weeks that I had to endure as a student, I never tire of finals week on this side of the desk.
  • Final exams are to teachers what grandchildren are to parents.
  • Know your product. Believe in your product. Always tell the truth.  #warrenmilliman #effectivesales #effectiveteaching #effectiveliving
  • Know: An effective teacher is one who seeks to empty his well of knowledge and experience every time he teaches.
  • Know: An effective teacher is one who possesses a well of knowledge and experience from which he can always draw.
  • Believe: An effective teacher is passionate, and passion covers a multitude of pedagogical sins.
  • Believe: An effective teacher has fun—he is a performer, a ham, a gadfly, a salesman, a proselyte. Oh, he also is exhausted.
  • Believe: The course content of an effective teacher is himself.
  • Truth: I don’t know, but I can find out.
  • Truth: The purpose of education is humility. The possession of both a Ph.D. and pride is a contradiction.
  • Tangents and rabbit trails: When education usually occurs.
  • Story: What we all live, what we all communicate, how we all learn, how we all change. Everything else is distraction.
  • Wise students select teachers, not courses.
  • The effective teacher cannot not teach, not just content, but other human beings.
  • 3:00—Submitted final grades. 3:30—Drove home. 5:00—Started preparing for next fall’s classes. 10:00—105 days to go. #ithinkivegotthedisease
  • Nick-Marissa-Laura-Jordan-Jamie-Fred: charis kai eirēnē. I tried to leave u w/ Greek. I also left u w/ me. Please be good stewards of both.

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Please read my earlier post, “Learning from the ‘Egyptians.'” There I give my rationale for making that post, a rationale that also applies to the following one.

“Ten Commandments for Teachers,” The New York Times Magazine, 1951.

  1. Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.
  2. Do not think it worthwhile to proceed by concealing evidence, for the evidence is sure to come to light.
  3. Never try to discourage thinking for you are sure to succeed.
  4. When you meet with opposition, even if it should be from your husband or your children, endeavor to overcome it by argument and not by authority, for a victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory.
  5. Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found.
  6. Do not use power to suppress opinions you think pernicious, for if you do the opinions will suppress you.
  7. Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.
  8. Find more pleasure in intelligent dissent than in passive agreement, for, if you value intelligence as you should, the former implies a deeper agreement than the latter.
  9. Be scrupulously truthful, even if the truth is inconvenient, for it is more inconvenient when you try to conceal it.
  10. Do not feel envious of the happiness of those who live in a fool’s paradise, for only a fool will think that is happiness.

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A prominent Christian College affirms in its mission statement that it is “a Christian community of the liberal arts” that “remains dedicated to” “education, not theological indoctrination” and to “scholarship which is integrally Christian.” This statement complements its tagline, “Freedom within a framework of faith.” These affirmations aptly describe Christian liberal arts education. By exploring this description, the attractiveness of this education becomes clear.

Education and scholarship focus on furnishing the mind. By contrast, training focuses on developing skills for performing a job. Education may exist apart from training, but training cannot exist apart from education. Education, then, must be a priority at any college, but especially a liberal arts college. (more…)

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